Co-op Canyon by Standard

By  |  Comments

Project: Co-op Canyon |Re: Vision Dollas competition – honorable mention|
Location: Dallas, United States of America
Designed by Standard
Standard proposed Co-op Canyon, a sustainable, zero carbon, no waste water community of modern, terraced urban dwellings overlooking a lush urban canyon. This natural design draws inspiration from the cliffside villages of the Anasazi Indians. Per Standard’s modernized design, vertical gardens comprised of front yard green allotments of native landscape and backyard green allotments of edible gardens punctuate a louvered facade, adding texture and greenery. Interstitial spaces such as the canyon floor, skip-stop lobbies, and the community kitchen encourage interaction and community connectivity. Food is the common thread that connects members of the community, with a community farm and individual back yard gardens growing food for the modern village’s inhabitants. More info and images under the cut

FOOD is the thread that knits the community together. Garden allotments, both concentrated in the project’s Community Farm, and dispersed throughout the backyard terraces, allow residents to grow, exchange and share canyon-grown produce. Hobbyists grow produce for daily needs and informal exchange in the Backyard allotments, and the terraces host small gatherings and cookouts. The Community Farm is the focal point of the southern canyon, situated on the stepped terraces that link the levels of the canyon floor. Produce from the Community Farm is consumed in the Community Kitchen and sold in the market spaces below. The Community Kitchen, where the exchange of knowledge about healthy diet, cultural and family cooking techniques is a resource for healthy eating. Located adjacent to the child care center and the fitness center, the Community Kitchen offers regular classes and food tastings focused on nutrition, locally grown produce, and sharing cultural traditions. The Community Kitchen is a part of holistic approach to health that includes exercise and intergenerational social interaction encouraged by work in the canyon’s gardens. Read the rest HERE.
*Source | Bustler